"Inverse" Ketschker or Ketschker to "Back Side"

13 Feb 2015Steve Schwarz

This is a handling “move” that I haven’t seen used often but I find it interesting and, like the Ketschker to which it is related, dogs seem to “read” or understand it with little to no special training. In a nutshell, the handler is facing the dog as they approach the jump and uses the arm nearest the jump (arguably the dog side arm) to send the dog to the Back Side of the jump. The handler then steps forward as the dog commits to the jump; thereby having the dog Blind Cross the handler.

It probably makes more sense if you look at this diagram comparing the major actions of a Front Cross Wrap, a Ketschker and what I’m calling and Inverse Ketschker:

Diagram of Inverse Ketschker

More helpful might be this video of me trying it with Meeker and Flyer on the green wing jump (my first ever attempt with Flyer):

In this video at about 30 seconds you can watch multiple World Champion Lisa Frick use it (and hear the crowd!):

The Handling

Let’s first talk about the cues used in the Ketschker. On the approach to the jump the handler rotates in to the dog, decelerates, and as they are rotated toward the dog they cue the jump with the now dog side arm. That is, the handler basically cues a Front Cross Jump Wrap but they are not leaving room at the edge of the jump standard/wing for the dog; they are in front of the jump/wing. As the dog commits to the jump the handler moves forward and the handler/dog perform a Blind Cross as the dog lands on the other side of the handler. By not leaving a gap between the handler and the jump the dog only sees the correct side of the handler. The handler re-connects with the dog on their new side.

For this move the cues to the dog are almost identical; the difference being the handler cues the edge of the wing as if it was the jump and then the dog jumps after wrapping the wing and blind crossing the handler. Here’s the Ketschker wording above updated: On the approach to the jump wing the handler rotates in to the dog, decelerates, and as they are rotated toward the dog they cue the back side of the jump with the now dog side arm. That is, the handler basically cues a Front Cross Jump Wrap but they are not leaving room at the edge of the jump standard/wing for the dog; they are in front of the jump/wing. As the dog commits to the jump they step forward and the handler/dog perform a Blind Cross as the dog lands on the other side of the handler. By not leaving a gap between the handler and the jump the dog only sees the correct side of jump on the approach the handler. The handler re-connects with the dog on the new side.

So by putting the Wrap/Blind Cross before the jump the order of actions for the dog is opposite (although the handler cues are basically the same). After doing some searching I found this definition of inverse seems to fit:

inverse

ˈinvərs, inˈvərs

opposite or contrary in position, direction, order, or effect.

Google

Play around with this “move” and see if it is something you want to add to your handling arsenal!

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